Not so long ago, Derrick Rose was one of the league’s biggest stars and the guy that was supposed to finally take the Chicago Bulls back to the greatest stage of the NBA and lead them to the Chip again.

Rose’s career got off to a terrific start, winning back-to-back State titles at Simeon Career Academy, something no other Illinois based school had ever accomplished before his arrival, recording 120 wins and 12 losses throughout his high school career.

Spending one season at Memphis University, Rose was already showing glances of greatness, scoring 14.9 points to go along with 4.7 dimes and 4.5 boards per game, leading the Tigers to the NCAA Championship game where they eventually fell against the Jayhawks.

Derrick declared eligible for the 2008 NBA Draft, eventually being drafted 1st overall by his hometown team, the Chicago Bulls, becoming the first rookie to ever score 20 or more points in 45 games since Michael Jordan did it.

Rose outplayed every opponent he faced with his crafty moves, his explosiveness, athleticism and clutch, taking the league for assault since day one en route to the 2008-09 Rookie of the Year award.

Just a couple of years later, Rose led the Bulls to the best record in the NBA (62-20) and was able to get a grab on the MVP award, posting averages of 25 points, 4.1 rebounds, 7.7 assists and 1 steal per game, but Miami’s big 3 got the last laugh in the Conference Finals.

Enter the 2011-12 campaign, the beginning of the end, an injury-plagued season that would take the Rose we knew and loved away from us, missing 37 games due to several nagging pains after missing a combined 6 throughout his first 3 seasons, and suffering a season-ending knee injury in the first game of the playoffs against the Philadelphia 76ers.

Rose was just never able to shake off his constant injuries, and his constant comeback attempts were just failure after failure up to the point where everybody questioned him and his motivation to go back to an NBA hardwood.

Derrick lost most of his explosiveness, his killer mentality and his shooting stroke, and after taking the passenger seat when Jimmy Butler emerged as the Chicago Bulls’ star, he pretty much became expendable for the team he was supposed to make great once again.

So, Rose was sent alongside Joakim Noah to the New York Knicks, where he was forced to miss 18 games due to several injuries and averaged 18 points and just over 4 dimes per contest, showing that perhaps he was still not done yet and could pursue one last big contract before retiring.

Enter his disastrous stint at Cleveland, where he was even rumored to be considering retirement, just after LeBron James stated that he was keen to get him a new big contract, but one injury after another, Rose was only able to make 16 appearances (7 starts) and post averages of 9.8 points and 1.8 assists a game.

That kind of lousy performances plus some great struggles by the Cavs made the team send the point guard to Utah via trade, but he was immediately waived and it doesn’t look like there are going to be any takers for the former MVP.

Rose is just 29 years old and some may say he has a lot left on the tank, but his lack of confidence and commitment and proneness to get hurt make him a very difficult guy to trust with a contract up to this point of his career.

According to Ken Berger of Bleacher Report, maybe Derrick Rose will not play again this season.

“The injuries and lack of enthusiasm to play hurts him,” a Western Conference executive told B/R.

Barring something unforeseen, multiple team executives contacted by B/R are convinced that Rose may have to wait till next year.

To this point, Rose has received a couple of 10-day contract offers, but nothing more attractive or substantial, league sources told B/R. He’s looking for an opportunity that could be a longer-term fit—and one with a team that’s ready to win now, or soon, as opposed to rebuilding.

We’ll always remember the exciting D-Rose of the beginning of the decade, a guy that made a whole city believe once again, but nowadays, this one’s just one of the saddest “what if” stories the league has ever seen.

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